Short Breaks in Norfolk: Steam Trains and Historic Sites in Norfolk


Short breaks in Norfolk can be filled with endless tourist attractions and sights to see. The stunning countryside and coast of North Norfolk has long been admired by ornithologists, artists and photographers.

Norfolk is home to the lovingly preserved North Norfolk railway. The coastal railway, also known as the Poppy Line because of the flowers that bloom along the track, operates both steam and historic diesel engines and connects the town of Sheringham to Weybourne and Holt. Further afield, there is the Bure valley railway with a steam train that tootles along the track and the restored mid-Norfolk railway also operates steam-hauled excursions.
http://www.thegeorgehotelatcley.co.uk/2015/12/short-breaks-norfolk-steam-trains-historic-sites-norfolk/

Reasons for Visiting Cley Marshes during Short Breaks in Norfolk.


“Cley-Next-The-Sea is a timeless North Norfolk seaside brick and flint village with a traditional red telephone box and storybook streets. The George Hotel at Cley dates back to 18th Century. The building has survived World War II bombing and the 1953 floods. In 1926 The George hosted the inaugural meeting of the Norfolk Wildlife Trust – or The Norfolk Naturalists Trust as it was called then – after their purchase of 407 acres of the nearby Cley Marshes for £5,160.
Its subsequent planning and operation has become the blueprint for all forms of nature conservation across the UK.

Over the years more and more people are spending short breaks in Norfolk, and Cley marshes has become increasingly popular with bird watchers, wildlife photographers and nature lovers. Ever watchful of the delicate balance between nature and human activity, in 2007 the Trust opened its visitor centre. The centre is eco-friendly and has a shop, viewing areas and cafe.
http://www.thegeorgehotelatcley.co.uk/2015/11/reasons-for-visiting-cley-marshes-during-short-breaks-in-norfolk/

Short Breaks in Norfolk: The Top 3 Things to Do in Cley-next-the-Sea


The Cley Marshes is a bird breeding sanctuary and thus serves as Norfolk’s premier bird watching site. It’s famous for being one of the oldest and most well-kept natuel reserves in the world, and birds like the marsh harrier, northern lapwing and the island-nesting avocet call this ecological haven their home.
http://www.thegeorgehotelatcley.co.uk/2015/02/short-breaks-in-norfolk-the-top-3-things-to-do-in-cley-next-the-sea/